Victorian Kitchen

Food History Lessons in Powderham’s Victorian Kitchen

Steeped in history, Powderham Castle has been in the Courtenay family for over 600 years. Needless to say, a visit to the Powderham Food Festival is not complete without a visit to the Castle itself, and in particular the Victorian kitchen, giving children and adults an insight into what the kitchens would have looked like in the 19th Century.

 

VICTORIAN KITCHEN – SATURDAY

11.00 GILL KEENE IN HER VICTORIAN KITCHEN
Experience life in Victorian Kitchen with a Victorian cook

Victoria Kitchen

12.30 GILL KEENE IN HER VICTORIAN KITCHEN
Experience life in Victorian Kitchen with a Victorian Cook

14.00 PAUL CLEAVE, TEA AT POWDERHAM CASTLE
Time for tea – stories and traditions

Paul has a long term interest in food and its history. His research includes the social history of food, tourism, and hospitality. He is currently investigating the
the revival of traditional food in Devon and Cornwall – particularly afternoon tea. And he is preparing something delicious with Powderham Castle mulberries!

Paul Cleave

15.00 LORI REICH, FRUIT VINEGARS AND SHRUB
Before there was fruit squash there were fruit vinegars and just what is shrub?
Lori Reich, fruit farmer and award winning Shute Fruit preserves maker explains how these were made and how they were drunk.

Lori Reich

VICTORIAN KITCHEN – SUNDAY

11.00 GILL KEENE IN HER VICTORIAN KITCHEN
Experience life in Victorian Kitchen with a Victorian Cook

12.30 GILL KEENE IN HER VCTORIAN KITCHEN
Experience life in Victorian Kitchen with a Victorian Cook

14.00 JENNY TUNLEY-PRICE, The Walled Garden Maristow
GROWING TEA IN DEVON
Jenny grows 500 tea bushes on the banks of the Tamar River,
Devon’s first tea plantation. She is keen to show us just which tea goes with which foods believing tea can be drunk at every meal.

Tea

15.00 DR. ERICA ROWAN, UNIVERSITY OF EXETER

Soaked in honey and covered in salt: Food preservation in the Roman world

Erica’s talk will focus on the different preservation techniques that the Romans used to prevent food from spoiling and to ensure they could still eat well in the winter. So drying, salting, pickling, fermentation and smoking. I’ll look at what methods were used for particular goods, ie. fruit, fish, meat, vegetables and how techniques were either similar to those used today (Exeter was after all a Roman city)or quite different. I’ll also talk about some of the stranger things they preserved (pickled lettuce), and of course she’ll talk about the always popular fish sauce.

Erica is currently a lecturer in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter. Her research focuses upon Roman diet and Roman food culture. In 2014 I she was awarded her DPhil in Archaeology from the University of Oxford, with a specialisation in Roman archaeology and archaeobotany (ancient plant remains).

Roman Food